Lidia

With my first child, I listened to a lot of people about the alleged link between immunisation and autism, and that made me a little bit uncertain about immunisation.

Lidia’s Story

My partner and I are both really active in our parenting. We are trying different things all the time. We have always used cloth nappies and we believe in baby-led weaning – there is no mash at our house! Our babies like to gnaw on a chop. We also believe in the 5 second rule – if something drops on the floor we don’t worry too much. It’s just another way to build up their immunity. Our little girl, aged almost three, has missed very little day care.

I am a working mum although I’m on maternity leave right now with son, who’s eight weeks old. If my children need to miss weeks of day care due to an epidemic, myself or my husband will need to be at home with them. It is really difficult for everyone. Immunisation is important to me because I want to protect my children from anything that could harm them. Vaccinations have always been a part of my life. We have the ability to avoid infectious diseases, so we should take advantage of the progress made by science.

My local GP sends me reminders every time my children are due for a vaccination and I put the reminders onto my calendar so I remember to make the appointment. With my first child, I listened to a lot of people about the alleged link between immunisation and autism, and that made me a little bit uncertain about immunisation. But my GP is fantastic and I chose to listen to her, and I listened to my Obstetrician too. They are experts who study these things in depth, and are paid to know all the details. My GP is particularly thorough in explaining the potential risks, side effects and benefits of each vaccination. That’s been extremely important to me, particularly when I was a new mum who was a little uncertain about vaccinations.

By the time I had my second child, I was totally OK with immunisation. He cried, but he was fine once he had a cuddle. The three to five year olds are more aware at their immunisation, but straight afterwards they’re given lollies or stickers and it’s forgotten in minutes. We have experienced a little irritability after some of the immunisations, but it is certainly worth it in the long run if we can avoid outbreaks of serious disease.

My little girl goes to a community child care centre where we have formed some good strong bonds with other parents. I make suggestions and the centre listens – it feels really good to get involved. If my daughter has an infection I give her antibiotics, otherwise she can’t go to day care. She is so miserable when she is unwell. I think, what is the point of risking that, and much worse, by not immunising?